Treasure Chest Thursday: The Hidden Sword Blade Guard in a Secret Compartment of Grace McClellan’s Sideboard

In 1969, after the passing of Nana Grace (Hanson) McClellan, a large wooden sideboard from her house was moved next door to her granddaughter Edna’s home, where it has sat by the kitchen table for 43 years. This month, Edna gave the sideboard to her daughter Debbie, and a small group of family members gathered to help maneuver the heavy piece of furniture. As they cleared out the sideboard of possessions that had accumulated over the years, they uncovered a false back in one of the drawers, which was moved to reveal a small hidden compartment. Neither Edna nor anyone in the family had ever known of the compartment’s existence since its arrival in 1969.

Imagine the surprise, then, to open the compartment and discover this little treasure sitting inside:

Brass object discovered in a hidden compartment in Nana McClellan’s sideboard. Photograph courtesy of Don Blauss.

The object was made out of brass, with a design featuring an eagle with six arrows behind the eagle and a narrow arm with a floral design along the arm. It’s the handle and blade guard to a sword – with the sword missing, of course.

Back side of the brass sword handle and blade guard. Photo courtesy of Don Blauss.

Grace (Hanson) McClellan acquired the sideboard from Daniel Waldo Field, the Brockton shoe manufacturer and philanthropist, who died in 1944. Although the exact date of purchase is uncertain, it probably occurred between 31 January 1920 (when Grace Hanson of Whitman, Mass. married Roderic McClellan of Hanson, Mass.) and the death of D. W. Field in 1944.

With that piece of provenance, there are four probable scenarios for who originally owned the blade guard (and missing sword):

1) An ancestor of Grace (Hanson) McClellan (1886-1969)

2) An ancestor of Roderic McClellan (1882-1962), the husband of Grace (Hanson) McClellan

3) An ancestor of Edith (Ramsdell) McClellan (1883-1918), the first wife of Roderic McClellan

4) An ancestor of Daniel Waldo Field (1856-1944). This seems unlikely if the sideboard was sold during his lifetime, because he presumably would have known that the piece was hidden in the compartment. However, if it was sold perhaps as part of his estate after his decease, its possible that his heirs were not aware that it was hidden.

Additionally, there’s the chance that Roderic and Grace McClellan or Daniel Waldo Field picked up the piece as a curiosity and hid it away, although the hidden nature of the compartment suggests it held value – sentimentally or financially. And it’s also possible that someone owned the sideboard prior to D. W. Field, though the chances of it remaining undiscovered during so many moves over the years seems unlikely.

Closeup of blade guard. Photo courtesy of Don Blauss.

Closeup of the top of the blade guard, including the hole where the sword used to sit. Photo courtesy of Don Blauss.

 

Base of the handle and blade guard. Photo courtesy of Don Blauss.

The eagle with six arrows behind it certainly suggests a military decoration, such as the federal war eagle. A search for similar blade guards online resulted in some similiar matches, such as this blade guard attached to a Spanish-American War sword for a New York officer:

sword was presented to First Lieutenant Alfred Somerset Orchard Commanding Company D 23rd Regiment National Guard of the State of New York on the occasion of his promotion. Courtesy of Specialist Auctions.

A Civil War era Calvary officer’s blade guard had a similiar eagle with six arrows:

Civil War era Calvary Officer’s Sword. Courtesy of Civil War Preservations.

But without any maker’s mark or inscribed date on the brass guard, it is difficult to pinpoint the exact era of the sword. If anyone can locate another guard with the exact same design with a known provenance, that would be extremely useful in helping to solve the mystery of the guard’s original owner.

But assuming that the sword could possibly date to World War I (1917-1918 for U.S.), the Spanish American War (1898), or the Civil War (1861-1865), let’s revisit the four possible owners.

1) An ancestor of Grace (Hanson) McClellan (1886-1969). Grace Hanson was born and raised in Baltimore, Maryland to John F. Hanson and Lila Cody and orphaned when she was a teenager. She then went to live in the household of her maternal aunt Margaret (Cody) Andrews and Fred Andrews in Brockton, Massachusetts, where she became a schoolteacher. Little is known about her father, but according to the 1910 Census, he was born in England, and if he was a similar age to his wife Lila Cody (b. ca. 1864, Maryland), he was too young for service in the Civil War. It is uncertain if he was alive for the Spanish American War – the family has not yet been identified in the 1900 Census. So with just those bare facts, he seems an unlikely candidate for the original sword owner. Lila (Cody) Hanson’s father, Martin Cody, was probably the 39 year old “Martin Codey” who enlisted from Baltimore as a private on probably in June 1863 in Company G, 10th Regiment Infantry of Maryland Volunteers for a six month term, but likely never reported for duty when his information was filed 10 July 1863, since he was listed as AWOL on 5 July 1863 and by October 1863 was classified as deserted. Since he enlisted but probably did not report for duty, it is unlikely he received a uniform or weaponry. Additionally, he had two eldest sons, and several of his daughters moved and married in Massachusetts, so any of those children would probably more likely to inherit war mementoes than his orphaned granddaughter Grace Elizabeth Hanson would have. Therefore, Grace (Hanson) McClellan and her immediate ancestors can probably be eliminated as the original owner of the sword, if it indeed dates to Civil War, Spanish American War, or World War I military service.

2) An ancestor of Roderic McClellan (1882-1962), the husband of Grace (Hanson) McClellan. Roderic himself served in the Massachusetts State Guard during WWI, a duty sergeant of N Company in the Fourteenth Regiment of Infantry, which was disbanded on 18 December 1918. He was the top-ranking sharpshooter in his company during that time. However, there is no evidence that he was issued a sword.

Roderic McClellan in uniform. Duty Sergeant, Company N, 14th Regiment of the Massachusetts State Guard. Circa August 1918.

Roderic’s father, George McClellan (1848-1912), was from Nova Scotia and living in Canada during the Civil War (and too young to serve) and had abandoned his wife and children in the 1890s and did not serve in the Spanish American War. His paternal grandfather Dougald McClellan lived in Canada and had died by the American Civil War. His maternal grandfather, Barnabas Everson, did not serve in the Civil War and died before the Spanish American War. Therefore, Roderic McClellan and his immediate ancestors can be eliminated as the original owner of the sword, if it indeed dates to Civil War, Spanish American War, or World War I military service.

3) An ancestor of Edith (Ramsdell) McClellan (1883-1918), the first wife of Roderic McClellan. Roderic McClellan married Grace Elizabeth Hanson in 1920, two years after the death of his first wife, Edith May Ramsdell, who died in 1918 during the Spanish influenza epidemic. Her father, Edgar O. Ramsdell (1863-1899) was too young for Civil War service and did not serve in the Spanish American War. Her paternal grandfather, John Brooks Ramsdell (1819-1895) did not serve in the Civil War and died before the Spanish American War. Her maternal grandfather, Caleb Francs Wright (1828-1907) registered for the Civil War Draft in June 1863, but did not serve in the Civil War or Spanish American War.

4) An ancestor of Daniel Waldo Field (1856-1944). D.W. Field was too young for service in the Civil War, and his father, William Lawrence Field (1828-1914) did not serve. D. W. Field married Rosa A. Howes of Barnstable in 1879. Her father, Philip Howes (1811-1867), also did not serve in the Civil War.

So unfortunately, that provides no likely suspects for the original owner of the sword. Perhaps if more details come to light about the provenance of the sword, or if anyone can help to date the sword more precisely, further details can be brought to light.

 

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Travel Tuesday: Connecting Hurricane Island, Maine to the San Donato Val di Comino Diaspora

Loreto Salvucci, a granite stonecutter from San Donato Val di Comino, Italy, left his home in the Comino Valley – and his usually pregnant wife Carmela (DiBona) four times to come to the U.S. to work in American quarries in 1899, 1904, 1905, and 1909. In 1906, his younger half-brother, Gaetano Salvucci, had moved permanently to the U.S., settling in Quincy, Massachusetts where he worked as a granite polisher. Additionally, Loreto’s mother-in-law Carmela (Paglia) DiBona, and several DiBona in-laws were also living and working in the granite industry Quincy, Mass. by 1900 – along with numerous extended friends and family members from San Donato Val di Comino who also settled in Quincy.

According to the family, Loreto’s wife Carmela and their four children Luigi (b. 1898), Lucio (b. 1903), Raffaele (b. 1906) and baby Eda (b. 1910) immigrated from Italy to Boston to permanently join Loreto and reunite the family. Their next child, Eva, was born at Quincy in 1912. All their remaining children were born in Quincy, and during the ten years after being reunited, Loreto saved his earnings to afford a home of his own in Quincy, having rented several apartments during that time.

With all these details, it seemed natural to assume that the family reunited in Quincy in 1910 and immediately began to settle in to home and work there. I had previously been unable to locate Loreto, either as a solitary granite worker, or with his reunited family in the 1910 Census. However, I knew that Carmela and the kids arrived in Boston in April of 1910, right around the time of the census, so guessed that perhaps they had not yet arrived and Loreto was simply lost in the shuffle or somehow mistranscribed in the census.

But a family photo pointed to a clue:

Lucio “Lou”, Raffaele “Ralph”, Luigi “Gig”, and Eda Salvucci, Hurricane Island, Maine, 1910

The back of the photograph was labeled:

Photograph Label for the Salvucci Children, Hurricane Island, Maine, 1910

Never assume!! I searched for Knox County, Maine, and located a family whose head of household was transcribed on Ancestry as “Lauis Salwrisi”. This actually showed the family of “Louis” and Carmela Salvucci – both listed as unable to speak English, only Italian. Enumerated 7 May 1910, just a week after Carmela and the Salvucci children arrived in the port of Boston on 28 April 1910 aboard the S.S. Canopic, the language barrier most likely was the cause of numerous errors that the census taker recorded for the family:

Louis [sic, Loreto] Salvucci, 38, married for 12 years, b. Italy, immigrated 1899, alien, a granite stonecutter, rents home

His wife Carmela, 35, mother of 4 living children, b. Italy, immigrated 1900 [sic, 1910]

His son Lugi [sic, Lucio] 6, b. Maine [sic Italy]

His son Raphael, 4, b. Maine [sic, Italy]

His son [sic, daughter!!] “Eighty” [sic, Eda, likely a phonetic spelling of nickname “Edy”], 6 months, b. Maine [sic, Italy]

His son Louis, 11, b. Maine [sic, Italy]

The family also lived with domestic Italian servant Mary Luxbring (21) and boarder Charles McCarthy, a crane car engineer.

They lived in the same dwelling house with two other families – likely it was a three family granite company tenement house.

In 1910, Hurricane Island was essentially a granite town, run by Booth Brothers & Hurricane Island Granite Company, which had been a thriving business until 1900 when demand began to wane and other quarries in New England offered easier access to the granite than an island off the coast of Maine. Hurricane Island granite was known for its pink-gray stone. The last shipment of granite from the island was in 1914, and by 1916 the island had been completely deserted, becoming a ghost town.

But in 1910, the granite company changed management, in an effort to try to revitalize the company, and likely Loreto Salvucci heard of their new job openings through the San Donato network, and hoped, along with the Hurricane Island Granite Company, for a new direction for both his job and newly arrived family. Numerous San Donato granite workers were located in both Quincy and Hurricane Island, passing word of jobs and connections through a wide network of family and friends. According to the history of Hurricane Island, workers earned $1.75-$2.50 per week, which went directly into an account at the company store.

Company houses at Hurricane Island, Maine, early 1900s, where the Salvucci family resided in 1910-1911, Courtesy of http://www.antique-photography.com/

Eastern End of the Hurricane Island Quarry

But the granite company struggled, and Loreto must have soon realized the stress of the struggling business was not worth the security of his family, so they returned to Quincy by 1912, where they had a larger support network of friends and family, and easier access to both necessities and comforts than they had found on the tiny island on the ocean off the coast of Maine. Choosing to leave Hurricane Island of their own accord, Loreto Salvucci unknowingly saved the family from the company’s final collapse: Hurricane Island Granite company’s final shipment was a barge of giant granite blocks en route to Rockport, which got caught in a storm on Nov. 8, 1914 and sank to the bottom of Penobscot Bay. That was the final straw for the company which ruined their finances. Management came to the island and announced the closing of the company and town immediately. Tools were left where they dropped.  The workers and families quickly gathered their possessions and got on the boat to the mainland.  All possible equipment was sold, and some still sits on the island abandoned. Several families remained for a few years, gathering abandoned possessions from the company housing tenements, and taking apart the buildings to sell for wood. At least the Salvucci family left on their own terms two years before this situation developed, and went on to prosper in the Quincy community.

[References: History of Hurricane Island; Booth Brothers and Hurricane Island Granite Company Manuscript Collection]

Amaneunsis Monday: Inventory of the Estate of Capt. Henry Josselyn of Pembroke, Mass., 1787

Below is a transcription of the inventory of Capt. Henry Josselyn of Pembroke, Mass. He was born at Scituate, Mass., 24 March 1696, the son of Henry Josselyn and Abigail Stockbridge. He married at Pembroke, 23 September 1718, Hannah Oldham. He died at Pembroke by 26 June 1787, when his probate was filed, at the age of 91 years. His eldest child, Hannah Josselyn, married Henry Munroe Sr. at Pembroke on 16 November 1738. The unknown origins of Mary Miller, the wife of their son Henry Munroe Jr., were recently discussed in this blog.

From Plymouth County, Massachusetts Probate Records, volume 30, page 195 [part of docket #11660]

Plymouth, SS. To Messrs. William Torrey, gentleman, James Bonney & David Oldham, yeoman, all of Pembroke in the county of Plymouth, Greeting –

You are hereby impowered and directed to make a just and equal appraisement of all the estate, real and personal, which Henry Josselyn, late of Pembroke, aforesaid, gentleman, deceased, died seized, in lawful money, and make return of this warrant with your doings, under your hands & upon your oaths, as soon as your can. Given under my hand and seal of office at Hanover, this 26th day of June 1787.

Joseph Cushing, Judge of Probate

An inventory and appraisement of the real & personal estate of which Henry Josselyn, late of Pembroke in the county of Plymouth, gentleman, deceased, died seized, taken by us the subscribers this fourth day of July 1787 by virtue of a warrant from ye Honorable Joseph Cushing, Esqr., Judge of Probate for the County aforesaid, viz –

Homestead farm, 280£ _ Foster Lot (so called) 216£…496.0.0

16 acres (so called) 45£ _ Wood lot in the West Parish [present-day Hanson, Mass.] 150£…195.0.0

Cedar Swamp, 3rd Lot 28.6.8 _ 9th ditto 28£ _ 13th ditto 26.13.4…83.0.0

22nd ditto 72£ _ 27th ditto 20£ _ fresh meadow 22£ … 114.0.0

Amount of real estate ___ £888.0

Wearing apparel … 1.16.6

[total] £889.16.6

William Torrey, James Bonney, David Oldham

Plymouth, SS. July 7th 1787. Then Josiah Smith, administrator with the will annexed on the estate of Capt. Henry Josselyn, late of Pembroke, deceased, made oath that this inventory contains all the estate of said deceased, that had come to his knowledge and if hereafter he should know of any other, he will render account of it, the appraisers having also made oath to the same. Before Joseph Cushing, Judge of Probate.

Plymouth, SS. To the Honorable Joseph Cushing, Esqr., Judge of the Probate of Wills &c., for & within the County of Plymouth. Humbly shows, Josiah Smith, administrator with the will annexed of Henry Josselyn, late of Pembroke, gentleman, deceased, that he apprehends said estate is insolvent, therefore, prays commissioners may be appointed to examine the claims thereon & such procedure has as the law in such case has provided and as &c.,

Josiah Smith.

Plymouth County, Mass. Probate Records, 30:195, Inventory of Henry Josselyn of Pembroke, Mass., 1787

Mystery Monday: Part Two: The Unidentified Friends and Family of Maria Jane (Peeples) Publicover of Gloucester and Beverly, Essex, Mass.

Two weeks ago I wrote about the lovely autograph book of Maria Jane Peeples of Gloucester, Mass. from the 1890s. Last week I discussed the wonderful but unlabeled photograph collection of Maria Jane Peeples and included the first part of her collection, including unidentified family and friends from Massachusetts, Connecticut, New York, and beyond.

Today’s entry will focus on her photographs of unidentified family or friends from Gloucester, Mass., where Maria lived for several years after moving from Nova Scotia. All of her siblings resided either briefly or permanently in Gloucester. Below is a brief genealogical sketch of her parents and siblings, taken from Canadian and U.S. Census records and Massachusetts vital records.

Thomas David Peeples was born at Nova Scotia, abt. 1828, son of James Peeples and Mary Crittenden. He died at prob. Melford, Guysborough County, Nova Scotia, 1891-1893. He married at prob. Guysborough County, Nova Scotia, by 1854, Jeanette Rogers. She was born at Nova Scotia, February 1835, daughter of William Rogers and Janet (McNair) Murray. She died at Gloucester, Essex, Mass., aft. 1910.

Thomas D. Peeples was a head of household at Guysborough County, Nova Scotia in the 1861, 1871, 1881, 1891 Censuses of Canada.

Children of Thomas D. Peeples and Jane Rogers:

i.   Martha Ann Peeples, b. at Pirate Harbor, Guysborough County, Nova Scotia, March 1855; d. at Gloucester, Essex, Mass., 4 December 1906; m. at Gloucester, Essex, Mass., 25 February 1882, Charles W. McClellan.

ii.   Gertrude Ernestine Peeples, b. at Melford, Guysborough County, Nova Scotia, November 1857; d. at prob. Gloucester, Essex, Mass., aft. 1910; m. at Gloucester, Essex, Mass., 23 August 1877, Ernest Robinson.

iii.   James David Peeples, b. at Melford, Guysborough County, Nova Scotia, September 1861; d. at prob. Hartford, Conn.,  aft. 1900; m. at Gloucester, Essex, Mass., 28 October 1885, Mary McCormack.

iv.   Thomas William Peeples, b. at Melford, Guysborough County, Nova Scotia, November 1863; d. at Danvers, Essex, Mass., 26 January 1902; m. at Gloucester, Essex, Mass., 14 February 1896, Edith Laurie.

v.   Drusilla Peeples, b. at Melford, Guysborough County, 24 September 1864; d. at Seattle, King, Washington, 28 November 1925; m. at Gloucester, Essex, Mass., 8 February 1893, Henry Calder.

vi.   Maria Jane Peeples, b. at Melford, Guysborough County, Nova Scotia, September 1867; d. at Beverly, Essex, Mass., 6 January 1919; m. at Gloucester, Essex, Mass., 24 January 1894, Willard Binnie Publicover. Willard was b. at Nova Scotia, 12 May 1867, son of Daniel Publicover and Elizabeth Firth; d. at Beverly, Essex, Mass., 12 April 1940.

vii.       Susan Amelia Peeples, b. at Melford, Guysborough County, Nova Scotia, December 1870; d. at Gloucester, Essex, Mass., 4 April 1903.

Perhaps  descendants of Maria’s many friends, local historians, or historic photo buffs might be able to recognize the individuals in these images – and maybe give a face to the signatures from her autograph book! Included are transcriptions of the photographer’s labels. [For additional details and the scanned backs of several of the portraits, see the collection on Flickr].

Unidentified Portraits by Known Photographers

USA – Massachusetts – Gloucester, Mass.

Unidentified Woman, Gloucester, Mass. Photographer’s Label: E. Adams, 192 Main St., Gloucester, Mass.

Unidentified Woman, Gloucester, Mass. Photographer’s Label: E. Adams, 192 Main St., Gloucester, Mass.

Unidentified Man, Gloucester, Mass. Photographer’s Label: E. Adams, 192 Main St., Gloucester, Mass.

Unidentified Woman, Gloucester, Mass., 1888. Photographer’s Label (back): Adams, No. 120 Main Street, Gloucester, Mass. 1888

Unidentified Man, Gloucester, Mass. Photographer’s Label: Elite Studio, 192 Main St., Gloucester, Mass.

Unidentified Child, Gloucester, Mass. Photographer’s Label: Burnham, Elite Studio, Gloucester, Mass.

Unidentified Man, Gloucester, Mass. Photographer’s Label: Burnham, Gloucester

One of my favorite photographs from this collection, featuring this unknown woman in a glittering cape and costume:

Unidentified Woman, Gloucester, Mass. Photographer’s Label: Emery’s Boston [Studio?] 162 Main St., Gloucester, Mass.

And another favorite featuring this impressive hairstyle:

Unidentified Woman, Gloucester, Mass. Photographer’s Label: Walter Gardner, Gloucester, Mass.
Cabinet, Jr.

Unidentified Woman, Gloucester, Mass. Photographer’s Label: Walter Gardner, Gloucester, Mass.

Unidentified Child, Gloucester, Mass. Photographer’s Label: Walter Gardner, Gloucester, Mass.

Unidentified Man, Gloucester, Mass. Photographer’s Label: Low, 68 [or 62?] Main St., Gloucester, Mass.

Unidentified Woman, Gloucester, Mass. Photographer’s Label: G. C. Mears, 8 Centre Street, Gloucester, Mass.

Unidentified Children, Gloucester, Mass., 1889, Photographer’s Label: G. C. Mears, 8 Centre Street, Gloucester, Mass.

Unidentified Woman, Gloucester, Mass. Photographer’s Label: Mears, 62 Main Street, Gloucester

Unidentified Woman, Gloucester, Mass. Photographer’s Label: Mears, 62 Main St., Gloucester

Unidentified Man, Gloucester, Mass. Photographer’s Label: G.C. Mears, 62 Main St., Gloucester

Unidentified Woman, Gloucester, Mass. Photographer’s Label: Mears, 8 Centre St., Gloucester

Unidentified Woman, Gloucester, Mass., 1889. Photographer’s Label: G. C. Mears, 8 Centre Street, Gloucester, Mass.

Unidentified Man, Gloucester, Mass. Photographer’s Label: Mears, 62 Main Street, Gloucester

Unidentified Man, Gloucester, Mass. Photographer’s Label: G. C. Mears, 62 Main Street, Gloucester.

Unidentified Woman, Gloucester, Mass., 1889. Photographer’s Label: G. C. Mears, 8 Centre Street, Gloucester, Mass.

Unidentified Woman, Gloucester, Mass. Photographer’s Label: G. C. Mears, 8 Centre Street, Gloucester, Mass.

Unidentified Woman, Gloucester, Mass. Photographer’s Label: The Phelps Studio, Gloucester, Mass.

Unidentified Baby, Gloucester, Mass. Photographer’s Label: The Phelps Studio, Gloucester, Mass.

Unidentified Man, Gloucester, Mass. Photographer’s Label: The Phelps Studio, Gloucester, Mass.

Unidentified Child, Gloucester, Mass. Photographer’s Label: Silver’s Portrait Studio, 62 Main St., Gloucester, Mass.

Unidentified Man, Gloucester, Mass. Photographer’s Label: White, Gloucester, Mass.

Mystery Monday: Part One: The Unidentified Friends and Family of Maria Jane (Peeples) Publicover of Gloucester and Beverly, Essex, Mass.

This week Of Graveyards and Things was included in the blogroll from Geneabloggers. Welcome aboard, new readers! Earlier in the week I wrote about the lovely autograph book of Maria Jane Peeples of Gloucester, Mass. from the 1890s. With a few extra pairs of eyes on the blog, let’s see if anyone can help solve a related mystery pertaining to Maria. Based upon her autograph book and stories passed down in the family, it is obvious that Maria had a wealth of friends and family from the North Shore of Massachusetts, friends who worked or lived in and around Boston, family from Nova Scotia and Hartford, Conn., and beyond. She was quite the social gal, and in addition to her autograph book, she also collected an incredible collection of photographs of her friends and loved ones. Unfortunately, she did not label any of these photographs.

Last year, I had an excellent conversation with Tim Salls, the archivist at NEHGS, about the inherent problems with unidentified photographs. As the curator for the Hanson Historical Society, I had recently organized their photograph collection, which had a selection of unlabeled images. He recommended uploading the collection to Flickr and harnessed the power of crowdsourcing to help identify unlabeled people, places, and events. And what a recommendation!! Over the past year, HHS’s photograph collection at Flickr has generated interest and input from numerous residents, former residents, and descendants of Hansonites who have recognized photographs and generously helped to identify images. It has been a wonderful way to connect with the community.

Around the same time, I was motivated to purchase archival supplies and organize the incredible collection of documents, photographs, and artifacts of family history in my possession. In discussing the project with other family members, a few very generously gave me some items to add to the collection for preservation, including this unidentified photograph collection of Maria Jane (Peeples) Publicover from my aunt Maria. Once placed in archival folders, within archival boxes, labeled and organized, I felt these images would be better served digitized and put out there on the web – where perhaps  descendants of Maria’s many friends, local historians, or historic photo buffs might be able to recognize the individuals in these images – and maybe give a face to the signatures from her autograph book!

The majority of images have a photographer’s name and address, so I have organized the images here by town, with the completely unidentified images at the end. Included are transcriptions of the photographer’s labels. [For additional details and the scanned backs of several of the portraits, see the collection on Flickr]. Today’s post will feature her friends and family beyond Gloucester – next week’s will feature all of her Gloucester, Mass. photographs.

Unidentified Portraits by Known Photographers

USA – Massachusetts – Beverly, Mass.

Unidentified Girl, Beverly, Mass. Photographer’s Label: Novelty Photo Co., Beverly, Mass.

USA – Massachusetts – Boston, Mass.

Unidentified Man, Boston, Mass. Photographer’s Label: Wm H. Allen, 58 Temple Place, Boston
Cabinette

Unidentified Woman, Boston, Mass. Photographer’s Label (on back): Diamond Photo Co., 24 Tremont Row, Boston

Unidentified Woman, Boston, Mass. Photographer’s Label: Dunshee. Hill. 22 Winter St., Boston

Unidentified Woman, Boston, Mass. Photographer’s Label: Gray, 1030 Tremont St., Boston

Unidentified Man, Boston, Mass. Photographer’s Label: B. Frank Hatstat, 521 Washington Street, Boston

Unidentified Woman, Boston, Mass., c. 1893. Photographer’s Label: Notman Photo Co., 480 Boylston St. and 3 Park St., Copyrighted 1893

Unidentified Woman, Boston, Mass. Photographer’s Label: Ritz Art Studio, 49 Temple Place, Boston, Mass.

USA – Massachusetts – Newburyport, Mass.

Unidentified Woman, Newburyport, Mass. Photographer’s Label: Frazier, Newburyport, Mass.

USA – Massachusetts – Salem, Mass.

Unidentified Man, Salem, Mass. Photographer’s Label: Haswell, Salem, Mass.

Unidentified Man (Willard B. Publicover?), Salem, Mass. Photographer’s Label: Haswell, Salem, Mass.
Handwritten label (on back): W.B.P.
[W.B.P. likely stands for Willard B. Publicover, indicating that this photograph is of or belonging to Willard B. Publicover, the husband of Maria Jane Peeples]

Unidentified Woman, Salem, Mass., c. 1884. Photographer’s Label (back): T& P, Taylor & Preston, 188 Essex St., Salem, Mass., 1884.

USA – Massachusetts – West Somerville, Mass. or Old Orchard, Me.

Unidentified Child, West Somerville, Mass. or Old Orchard, Me. Photographer’s Label: Whittemore’s Studio, West Somerville, Mass. & Old Orchard, Me.

USA – Connecticut – Hartford, Conn.

Unidentified Woman, Hartford, Conn. Photographer’s Label: Lloyd, 368 Main Street, Hartford, Conn. [Possible Peeples relative?]

Unidentified Child, Hartford, Conn. [Possible Peeples relative?]

Unidentified Man, Hartford, Conn., c. 1889. Photographer’s Label: Olsen Portraits, Hartford [Possible Peeples relative?]

USA – Illinois – Chicago, Ill.

Unidentified Woman, Chicago, Ill. Photographer’s Label: J. E. Waters, 414 E. 63rd St., Chicago

USA – New Hampshire – Milford, N.H.

Unidentified Child, Milford, N.H. Photographer’s Label: Perkins, South Street, Milford, N.H.

USA – New York – Lima, N.Y.

Unidentified Men, Lima, N.Y. Photographer’s Label: G. E. Bronson, Lima, N.Y.
Handwritten label (on back): Sue
[Were these men perhaps sons of a friend named Sue? They are wearing numerous prize ribbons.]

USA – New York – Manhattan, N.Y.

Unidentified Woman, New York, N.Y. Photographer’s Label: Hall, Broadway and 34th St., New York

CANADA – New Glasgow, Nova Scotia

Unidentified Woman, New Glasgow, Nova Scotia Photographer’s Label: Thomas Cook, New Glasgow, N.S. [Possible a Peeples relative?]

ENGLAND – Barrow-In-Furness, Lancashire, England

Photographer’s label:
H. J. Taphouse, Barrow-In-Furness

Unidentified Portraits by Unknown Photographers

Unidentified Child

Unidentified Child

Unidentified Man

This is one of my favorites:

Unidentified Man and Dog

 

Unidentified Man

Unidentified Man

Unidentified Women

Autograph Book of Maria Jane Peeples, Gloucester, Mass., 1889-1900

Maria Jane (Peeples) Publicover, Beverly Farms, Mass. Courtesy of Maria McClellan.

Maria Jane Peeples (nicknamed “Rida” by her family) was the daughter of Thomas Peeples and Jane Rogers of Nova Scotia. She married Willard Binnie Publicover at St. John’s Episcopal Church, Gloucester, Essex, Mass., 24 January 1894, by Rev. John Alvey Mills.

From 1889-1900, she kept an autograph book in which her friends, family members – and a presumably courting Willard B. Publicover (he has several signatures and notes over the years) – signed their names and wrote her notes and poems – funny, poignant, sage, or straight to the point. She began keeping the autograph book while a resident of Gloucester, Mass. – several of her relatives moved to Hartford, Conn., as the autograph book shows. Below are photographs of the individual pages of the book, accompanied by transcriptions.

The autograph book cover:

Cover of Maria Jane Peeples’ Autograph Book, c. 1890-1891

Sister(-in-law) Mary (McCormack) Peeples Autograph, Hartford, Conn. 12 October 1891

To Rida,

I wish you joy, I wish you peace, I wish your friends may still increase and may you ever remain the same unchanged in all except the name.

Your sister, Mary, Hartford, Conn. Oct. the 12, 1891

______________________________________________________

Cousin Hattie Rogers and E.R.’s autographs

When far from you I go, will you one thought on me bestow. And let your memory often past In good times had in Gloucester, Mass.

From Your Cousin, Hattie Rogers. Aug. 14, 1891

______________________________________________________

Hap[p]y thoughts makes a pleasant day

E.R. [possibly brother-in-law Ernest Robinson?]

______________________________________________________

Jennie M Campbell Autograph, 3 November 1891, Gloucester Mass.

Jennie M. Campbell Gloucester, Mass. November 3, 1891

______________________________________________________

Eldridge Peeples Autograph, 11 October 1891, Hartford, Conn.

To Rida,

Remember me for can you must, as long as you can bite a crust

And when you can no longer bite, think of me if you think it rite.

Eldridge Peeples, Hartford, Conn. Oct. 11, 1891

______________________________________________________

Madie A. Campbell Autograph, 3 November 1891, Gloucester, Mass.

Madie A. Campbell, Gloucester, Mass. Nov. 3, 1891

______________________________________________________

J. D. Peeples and Bessie M. Wilkinson Autographs

When scattered abroad are land and sea

’tis if truly we owe to each other

to write a firm line and say something kind

this is the [idea?] of your brother

J.D. Peeples, Hartford, Conn. October 11th 1891. [brother James D. Peeples]

______________________________________________________

In friendships fond garden

In some sacred spot

Plant for me a fond forget-me-not

Bessie M. Wilkinson, Charlestown, Mass. Aug. 11, 1891

______________________________________________________

Charles A. Hayden Autograph, 13 November 1889, Gloucester, Mass.

May heaven’s blessing be always yours, I shall ever pray

Your true friend and rector, Charles A. Hayden. Gloucester, Nov. 13th 1889

______________________________________________________

Richard L. Morey and Rhoda M. Rogers’ Autographs

Let bygones be bygones, I foolishly say

And let you be wise and forget them

But old recollections may be active today

And you can do naught but regret them

Though the present be pleasant, joyous and gay

And promising well for tomorrow

Yet you may love to look back on the years right away

Embalming your bygones in sorrow.

Advice from your friend, Richard L. Morey

Dec. 15th 1889.

______________________________________________________

To Maria

May gladness be your portion

May mirth come at your call

May you be glad & happy

And blessed in dower & hall,

Rhoda M. Rogers, #15 Mt. Vernon St., Gloucester, Mass. Aug. 12th 1891

______________________________________________________

Lewis R. Martin and Mrs. Thomas D. Peeples Autographs

Lewis R. Martin, 55 Elm St., Charlestown, Mass.

______________________________________________________

Your loving morther, Mrs. Thomas D. Peeples

Pirate Harbor

[U.S. Carried?] N[ova] S[cotia]

______________________________________________________

Ella F. Welsh and Willard B. Publicover’s autographs

“Let the casket of memory contain one pearl for me”

Yours truly, Ella F. Welsh Gloucester, Sept. 25, 1889

______________________________________________________

Willard B. Publicover

Brattle Sq. Hotel

32-34 Brattle Sq. Cambridge, Mass.

______________________________________________________

Mrs. W. Engelhard Autograph, 12 October 1891, Hartford, Conn.

May hope in its surety and peace in its calm

Descend on thy spirit and bring to it calm

Mrs. W. Engelhard, Hartford, Conn. Oct. 12th 1891

______________________________________________________

Eva Englehart and W. B. Publicover autographs

Go show you that my thought of your still lives

Eva Englehart, Hartford, Conn. Oct. 12th 1891

______________________________________________________

To Maria,

If you your lips would keep from slips, five things observe with care

Of whom you speak to whom you speak and how and when and where

Your friend, W. B. Publicover

______________________________________________________

Maggie W. McPhee and Gertie E. Robinson Autographs

Remember me when “far, far off, where the wood-chuck die of the whooping cough”

Maggie W. McPhee, Gloucester, Mass. Oct. 15th 1891

______________________________________________________

To Rida,

To write in your album dear sister you ask

It’s well it is not such a difficult task

All I can say is contained in one line

May the blessing of heaven forever be thine

Gertie E. Robinson [sister Gertrude E. (Peeples) Robinson]

______________________________________________________

Images of hands holding birds and flowers, pasted into Autograph Book

Henry A. Calder and Ella E. Peeples Autographs

Henry A. Calder [future brother-in-law Henry Calder]

______________________________________________________

When you are supping tea with B.

Think of your poor old sister E.

Ella E. Peeples

Sept. 14th 1889 [possibly sister Drusilla Peeples?]

______________________________________________________

Mrs. Lizzie Adams Autograph, 27 September 1889, Gloucester, Mass.

In memories wreath of roses

Twine one bud for me

Mrs. Lizzie Adams

Gloucester, Mass. Sept. 27, 1889

______________________________________________________

Helena M. Gilbert Autograph, Gloucester, Mass.

“I shall not die but live & declare the works of the Lord”

Helena M Gibert

Gloucester, Mass.

______________________________________________________

Nellie C. Donovan Autograph, Beverly Farms, Mass., 17 February 1900

Nellie C. Donovan

Beverly Farms, Mass.

Feb. 17, 1900

______________________________________________________

B. Phalen Autograph, 26 September 1889, Gloucester, Mass.

Prove your friends.

Yours, B. Phalen

Gloucester, Mass. Sept. 26th /89

______________________________________________________

Blank Page in Autograph Book With Print of Girl in Flowers

Maria J. Peeples, Printed Card

[Printed card, perhaps a calling card or dance card?]

Maria J. Peeples

______________________________________________________

Autograph of “A Friend” (Probably Willard B. Publicover), 12 October 1890

To Maria

Curved is the line of beauty

Straight is the line of duty

Walk by the last and thou shalt see

The other ever follow thee

A Friend,

October 12th 1890

[appears to be the handwriting of Willard B. Publicover]

______________________________________________________

J. P. Mac Innis Autograph, 17 August 1891, Gloucester, Mass.

Memory is dearer, when pleasures trouble does mar

Life’s charities, like light

Spread smilingly afar,

Blend us as friends together

With a life of sweet content

And may the future be for you,

In glorious sunshine spent.

J. P. Mac Innis,

Gloucester, Mass.

August 17, 1891

______________________________________________________

Blank page featuring print of angel

Maggie A. Martin Autograph, Charlestown, Mass.

Maggie A. Martin

55 Elm St., Charlestown, Mass.

______________________________________________________

Lena P. Mackie Autograph and Coded Message from W. B. Publicover

[Words in each corner:] Love, Hope, Faith, Charity

Oct. 3rd 1896

Dear Maria

Remember me when far away

And your words I cannot hear

But hope that we will meet some day

In our home beyond the skies

Your friend,

Lena P. Mackie

[numbers written in pencil, perhaps Maria’s attempts at decoding the following page:] 111191101718

23114

1515

410

______________________________________________________

[note written in code]

Jin. u. a.nsy

W. B. P5bl3c4v2r.

ia. C12v2l1nd. 87.

G145c2972r. M199.

[possible translation: January, W. B. Publicover, [#?] Cleveland St., Gloucester, Mass.]

______________________________________________________

Maria J. Peeples and Hattie Rogers Autographs

Maria J. Peeples

Gloucester, Mass.

______________________________________________________

One line is sufficient for memory

Hattie Rogers, Gloucester, Mass.

Aug. 13, 1891

______________________________________________________

Nellie B. B. Phelan and M. C. Pernette Autographs

Not enjoyment and not sorrow

Is our [destined great?] and way;

But to act that each tomorrow

Finds us father than today

Very truly, Nellie B. B. Phelan,

Mill Village, Nova Scotia

Gloucester, Mass. Sept. 26th 1889

______________________________________________________

To Maria,

Never trouble trouble till trouble troubles you is the advice of your friend,

M. C. Pernette

Mar. 19th/94

Gloucester

Maria J. Peeples’ Autograph Book with Ruler

Autograph books are a lovely way to capture a better understanding of the community around one person’s life, which can often be difficult to reconstruct when pursuing genealogical research. If anyone out there has additional details or stories about the individuals who signed this autograph book, please feel free to share!

Amanuensis Monday: Marriage Records of Barnabas Everson and Deborah (Bates) Howland, 1848, Manhattan

Barnabas Everson of South Hanson, Plymouth County, Massachusetts (4 January 1825 – 22 February 1896) was a prominent citizen of the town, a wealthy businessman with major landholdings. His parents and grandparents were from the town of Hanson (or the part of Pembroke which became Hanson in 1820), and his children and grandchildren were born and raised in the town. It wasn’t until a recent inspection of the record of his marriage to the young widow Deborah (Bates) Howland (4 September 1819 – 16 April 1892), recorded at Hanson, that I noticed that their marriage was performed by an unexpected person: the mayor of New York City.

The Hanson, Mass. Marriage Record

The marriage record of Barnabas Everson and Deborah (Bates) Howland, recorded at Hanson [MA VRs 38:194], reads:

Marriages registered in the Town of Hanson for the year 1848-9, Isaiah Bearce, Clerk

[Registered] No.: 55   Date of Marriage: 1848 August 25th

Names & Surnames of Groom and Bride: Barnabas Everson & Deborah B. Howland

Residence of Each at Time of Marriage: Hanson & Hanson

Age of Each in Years: [Blank] & [Blank] Occupation of Groom: Mason

Place of Birth of Each: Hanson & East Bridgewater

Names of Parents: Richard Everson & Moses Bates

What Marriage, Whether 1st, 2nd, 3rd, &c.: 1st & 2nd

Name and Official Station of Person By Whom Married: W[illiam]. F[rederick]. Havemeyer, Mayor of N.Y. City

25 August 1848 Hanson, Mass. Marriage Record of Barnabas Everson and Deborah (Bates) Howland. [Courtesy of http://www.AmericanAncestors.org]

The Manhattan, N.Y. Marriage Record

Their marriage was also record at Manhattan, in the New York City Marriage Registers, v. 1-3, 1829-1860 [FHL Film no. 1671673], which was organized alphabetically by the first letter of the groom’s surname. The marriage record stated:

Date of Marriage: 1848 August 25

[GROOM] Name: Barnabas Everson; Place of Nativity: Mass.; Age (Years, Months, Days): 23 years; Residence: Mass.

[BRIDE] To Whom Married: Deborah B. Howland; Where Married: Mayor’s Office; By Whom Married: William F. Havemeyer; Color: white; Remarks: Mayor

First page of the 1848 Marriage Record of Barnabas Everson and Deborah (Bates) Howland. [FHL Film 1671673]

Second page of the 1848 Marriage Record of Barnabas Everson and Deborah (Bates) Howland. [FHL Film 1671673]

Barnabas generated an abundance of records throughout the course of his lifetime, with no obvious connections to Manhattan. Anyone know of a historical trend of couples traveling to Manhattan from rural New England towns to be wed?

[Genea-blogger John Newmark (author of TransylvanianDutch) started Amanuensis Monday: “A person employed to write what another dictates or to copy what has been written by another.”]